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Kunsthaus Zürich

Zurich Concrete Art

The artistic roots of Zurich Concrete Art go back to the Bauhaus, where several of its representatives studied and which Max Bill sought to reawaken in Ulm after the war. From the manifesto “Art concret” of Theo van Doesburg Bill adopted the term “concrete” to convey the idea that a work of art does not derive from nature but is an autonomous reality composed of colour and form, an “object for intellectual and spiritual use”. Whilst Bill and Richard Lohse turned increasingly to mathematical processes to produce images, Verena Loewensberg and Camille Graeser preferred a more playful, intuitive approach. The highly sensitive artist Fritz Glarner was closely connected with Piet Mondrian; thanks to the legacy of his widow, the course of this development is comprehensively documented in the Kunsthaus.

Fritz Glarner (1899-1972)
Composition-Interieur, 1938
Oil on canvas; 122 x 97 cm
©2013 Kunsthaus Zürich
Fritz Glarner (1899-1972)
Composition-Interieur, 1938
Oil on canvas; 122 x 97 cm
©2013 Kunsthaus Zürich